Academics

Kabuki in Akita

Twice each year, a traveling kabuki troup visits Akita for a performance and the Student Services office arranges transportation and participation for international and Japanese students to go take in the play as a group. Some of the student participants have been gracious enough to share their photos and stories from the event, so please read on to find out more about past outings!

Summer 2014 Kabuki Tour

Over the first weekend in June, international and Japanese students from AIU went out on a Student Services-organized tour to take observe a Japanese traditional kabuki play. A rare experience, even for native Japanese, kabuki is possibly the most dramatic form of traditional Japanese theater- drawing its name from a term meaning "bizarre" or "out of the ordinary"- and has been limited to only male actors for male and female roles since the mid-17th century.

Twice each year, a traveling kabuki troup visits Akita for a performance and the Student Services office arranges transportation and participation for international and Japanese students to go take in the play as a group. Two of the participating international students, Ms. Wing Man Lam, from The University of Hong Kong, and Ms. Helen Tresize, from The Australian National Unviersity, offered their thoughts (and photos!) from the tour.

Photo credit: Helen Tresize, The Australian National University

It was an awesome tour that bring me closer to Japanese traditional arts. It was astonishing that male performers were capable of acting like female with feminine gestures and perfect voices. The Japanese dance at the very beginning was the most impressive part among all. Although I could hardly understand the meaning of the script, every body movement of the performers conveyed elegance, beauty and preciseness. Therefore, I really enjoyed the tour so much.

-Wing Man Lam, The University of Hong Kong

AIU students eagerly awaiting the start of the show - Photo credit: Helen Tresize, The Australian National University

Our trip to the Kabuki performance was a very enjoyable experience. It was great to rub shoulders with the Akita locals, and enjoy together a truly unique Japanese style of theatre. Though the play was difficult to follow at times, the acting was very entertaining, and even educational – we now appreciate the restorative powers of sweet potato! Recommended for anyone wanting to experience some traditional Japanese culture.

- Helen Tresize, The Australian National University

Thank you to Wing Man and Helen for your contributions!